Nutrition is important for seniors’ daily lives. Nutrition requires you to think about what you eat and drink and how the foods you eat will maximize your body to perform at its best each day under multiple conditions.

 

To keep your diet healthy, you should try to consume many fruits and vegetables each day. The USDA recommended daily allowance of fruits and veggies combined is 9-13 servings a day. That sounds like a lot, but it’s really not difficult to fit them in. Have a glass of real orange juice with your breakfast or put tomato pasta sauce on your spaghetti.

 

Carbs are not the enemy. Your body needs carbs to survive and by cutting them out, you can cause your organs damage or even cause them to fail. That said, there are good and bad carbohydrates. The good ones tend to be complex carbs like whole-grain and other fiber-rich foods.

 

When choosing foods, think about nutritional value. Green beans seem nutritious, for example, but broccoli is a knockout in terms of nutrients, so it is better to pick broccoli for dinner. Potatoes are yummy, of course, and quite innocent, when they’re not slathered in butter or cream, but if you want to pack a truly nutritive punch, swap them out for sweet potatoes from time to time. They’re jam-packed with vitamin A and C and fiber. It’s said that sweet potatoes (NOT sweet potato fries, sorry!) are so nutritious, that you could survive on them alone.